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September 24th, 2016

Positive Attitudes in the Face of Competition

Too much time focused on winning and competing can distract from other important aspects of coaching young athletes. Teaching good sportsmanship and promoting respect for opponents often gets overlooked, but these are just as important to developing life skills. Coaches should be proactive about the conduct of their athletes and consider these four methods for promoting positive attitudes in the face of competition. Read More...

September 24th, 2016

Teaming Up with Teachers

Supporting your players’ academic work and checking on their progress is important, but did you realize that there are many other good reasons for coaches and teachers to communicate? Together, you and your players’ teachers can be a powerful team, ensuring the best for kids. Below are some scenarios where connecting with your classroom counterpart can benefit you, the teacher, and most importantly, your student-athletes. Read More...

September 17th, 2016

Developing a Policy for Parent Complaints

Regardless of the sport you coach, the size of your school, or where you are located, you will receive at least a few complaints from parents each season. Often, these intrusions from parents can be frustrating, as well as time consuming. In response, some coaches have developed formal policies on how parents should voice their concerns. This can ease tensions between coaches and parents, and it can make a parent think twice before issuing a complaint. Read More...

September 17th, 2016

Making Game Day Go Smoothly

Whether you compete on a field or a court, in a pool or on a track, there are a host of things you have to do in order to prepare for the contest. To get started, make a list of absolutely everything that you have to do to be ready to play a game. Some of these items you will do yourself and for others, you should ask for help. Read More...

September 3rd, 2016

Postgame Unwind

One of the most draining parts of being a coach is in-game coaching. From calling plays to determining substitutions to answering players’ questions, your brain is usually going in a thousand different directions. Once the game is over, coaches can be absorbed in an onslaught of self-analysis. And winning a nail biter can throw enough adrenaline into the system to keep a normally placid individual awake long past bedtime. But too much time spent hyped up after a game can lead to burnout. Here are some solutions. T Read More...

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